Healthcare

After Visiting North Carolina Water Park, the Person Suffered from Brain-Eating Amoeba

After visiting Fantasy Lake Water Park in North Carolina, a man named Eddie Gray was killed by an amoeba called Naegleria fowleri. Few days after visiting Fantasy Lake water park in Cumberland County, North Carolina, the victim died due to Naegleria fowleri infection. According to The State Department of Health and Human Resources, the man got infected by the amoeba naturally present in freshwater during the summer. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention checked and confirmed that the infection was caused by a single-celled organism called Naegleria fowleri, also known as the brain-eating amoeba. According to Health officials, the amoeba has infected just 145 people from 1962 to 2018 in the US.

Eddie Gray, age 59 living in Guildford County in NC – was visiting the Fantasy Lake Water Park along with Sedge Garden United Methodist Church group. Gray was fond of NASCAR, kayak, and fishing. According to the obituary, Gray is survived by a wife, a daughter, and two grandchildren. Fantasy Lake is famous for aquatic sports. The water park is located near Fayetteville, Cumberland County in NC. The warning board outside the park warns visitors about the presence and infections from Naegleria fowleri in warm freshwater.

The Health Department of Cumberland County suggests people take precautions before engaging in water sports activities. Precautions include keeping head over the surface, use of nose clips in the water, and avoiding diving into the water. Symptoms of the infection include vomiting, headaches, and nausea. There are high chances of death within 7 to 14 days after getting infected. Amoeba containing water is safe to swallow. Though, the amoeba can be transmitted to the brain through the olfactory nerve, which can destroy brain tissue. The last recorded case of death by Naegleria fowleri amoeba was of a student studying in college got infected after visiting the U.S National Whitewater Centre. Till date, there are 5 cases in North Carolina, and a large number of cases are from Florida and Texas.

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Doris Maguire

Doris is the senior correspondent in the healthcare sector of LIVINGWITHED. He has been working in the world of writing for a few years, but he has been interested in health and medicine from even before. Before joining the editorial team of LIVINGWITHED, Doris had worked for a few health blogs. He is a big fan of books, movies and travels.

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